How did the Nazis use propaganda?

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Goebbels sought to Nazify the whole of German culture, wiping away what Hitler saw as the ‘decadence of 1920s Weimar Germany, painting instead a picture of a Germany with traditional values and with Hitler as the beloved Führer.

The promotion of Nazi racial policy was at the very centre of Goebbels’s message.

The re-writing of school books and the production of antisemitic books, films and exhibitions supported this policy.

In 1929, Hitler chose Josef Goebbels as his Minister of Propaganda. Goebbels developed extremely successful campaigns using simple slogans and images repeated over and again in order to win public support for the party. The Nazis spent huge sums on newspapers, leaflets and poster campaigns.

Once the Nazis came to power Goebbels developed the Nazi’s use of propaganda to even greater effect. He orchestrated large political military ‘rallies’ to build support. These were vast, highly organised events with banners and marching bands. Using his own skills of oratory Hitler appealed to the patriotism of the German people.

Mass media

Control of the mass media was at the heart of Goebbels plan as he developed the cult of personality around Hitler. The rallies and Hitler’s speeches were broadcast on radio, purchased very cheaply as they were produced by the state.